Rincón del lector Inglés Básico

13th MAY

A pub, or public house, is a house licensed to sell alcohol to the general public. It is a drinking establishment in BritainIrelandNew Zealand, Canada, and Australia. In many places, especially in villages, a pub is the focal point of the community. Samuel Pepys described the pub as the heart of England.

Pubs can be traced back to Roman taverns, through the Anglo-Saxon alehouse to the development of the tied house system in the 19th century.

Pubs are socially and culturally distinct from cafés, bars and beer halls. Most offer a range of beers, wines, spirits, and soft drinks andsnacks. Traditionally the windows of town pubs were of smoked or frosted glass to obscure the clientele from the street but there has been a move towards clear glass and brighter interiors.

The owner, tenant or manager (licensee) is known as the pub landlord or publican. Referred to as their “local” by regulars, pubs are typically chosen for their proximity to home or work, the availability of a particular beer, a darts team, or a pool or snooker table.

Until the 1970s most of the larger pubs also featured an off-sales counter or attached shop for the sales of beers, wines and spirits for home consumption. In the 1970s, supermarkets and high street chain stores and off-licences undercut pub prices and all but a handful closed their off-sale counters.

 

 

8th APRIL


AS THE ARDENT SHADOW
Words are golden
As the eyes of the cat in the dark night
In front of flash light
Surprised it when it was watching the moon
My tongue is quiet testing the brevity
Of experience
There are not monosyllables
Only a noisy sight in the deepest music
If my free verse
Words are also red inside my body
As the fire in the mirror
As a fan turning the air, yellow
As a wed sex under the lightning
As a rape pomegranate full of sweet blood
Or gorgeous gems incrusted in the tongue´s pleasure
Because I know, you are in my body
When I named you
But also, when my saliva perfums your kisses
Sex between the harvest white fields
Black, red, yellow, in the central labyrinth
Of life
As a silence tonge shadow
Expressing music!

©Julie Sopetrán

DAWN
Light grows between the tree and tears
And the root hairs and the root cap and the scars
And the crown and the twig and the hummed buds
Are removing their dust
It is the time of day when I review my dreams
And birds tell me the truth before the clock awakes me
My hinder lover-love extend his arms as branches
Arriving to my soul. Oh! The stems and limbs and trunk
Sweet silent beauty
It is something reborn… It is something inside my blood!
My day starts with you in so many ways away around the world
Magic beliefs or rivers crossing the unknown
Because you are here as a weather time dragon
As a fire-flame burning your sorrow in my chest!
As a cloud raining over your hands
As the star glowing our feelings
Over this snow-covered dawn…!

8 HT APRIL
SHADOWS
My body discharged upon the land.-
Mean-while, I listened to the wind
From the sierra´s as it mischievoosly
Passed through my pasture.
It was like a breeze that in
The hands of the sun,
Croshed mirrors!
In the obscure plane of the
Jubilant reflections of my shadow,-
Exploded the colors of smiles.
And it was at that instant, that in
My eyes: “planets of solitaire”
I watched the wind,
-Dragging from the earth the wears,
and Dressing with my shadow the
Firmament!
DEEP DOWN IS BEAUTY
We don´t need to talk
Our hands express the silence around the river
Our eyes rest on the water
Flower´s fingers are flavouring the trees
The path of the border sings the distance
And there is a bird learning to sing
As a baby dreams, full of doubts
Is the silent embroidery by the evergreen?
What makes me tink about equivocal?
The chaos is magic
The blade of leaf reflects existence
And you are here
Touching my soul
What else do you want to know?
The clay is in the bottom of the river
Just reach out…
©Julie Sopetrán

 

 

11th March 2016

Saint Patrick´s Day

images

Every year on March 17, the Irish and the Irish-at-heart across the globe observe Saint Patrick’s Day. What began as a religious feast day for the patron saint of Ireland has become an international festival celebrating Irish culture with parades, dancing, special foods and a whole lot of green.

St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, is one of Christianity’s most widely known figures. But for all his celebrity, his life remains somewhat of a mystery. Many of the stories traditionally associated with St. Patrick, including the famous account of his banishing all the snakes from Ireland, are false, the products of hundreds of years of exaggerated storytelling.

 

IMG_1174

People all over the world celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, especially places with large Irish-American communities. Feasting on the day features traditional Irish food, including corned beef, corned cabbage, coffee, soda bread, potatoes, and shepherd’s pie. Many celebrations also hold an Irish breakfast of sausage, black and white pudding, fried eggs, and fried tomatoes. Common traditions include:

  • Parades – This event is most often associated with the holiday. Cities that hold large parades include Boston, New York, Philadelphia, New Orleans, Savannah, and other cities worldwide.
  • Drinking – Since many Catholics are Irish-American, some may be required to fast from drinking during Lent. However, they are allowed to break this fast during the St. Patrick’s Day celebrations. This is one cause for the day’s association with drinking heavily.
  • Dying water or beer green – Chicago dies its river green for the festivities, and many bars serve green-dyed beer. The White House fountain is also dyed green.
  • Other incorporations of green – In Seattle, the parade routes are painted in green. Observers are supposed to wear green or else risk being pinched. Parade floats and decorations will feature the color green.
  • Religious services – Those who celebrate the holiday in a religious context may also hold a feast. Outside of this context, overindulgence tends to revolve around drinking.
  • Pea planting – In the Northeast, many celebrate by planting peas. This is largely due to the color and time of year (prime pea-planting conditions).

 

images (10)

 

 

12th February 2016

Valentine´s Day

Valentine´s Day is a time when people show feelings of love, affection and friendship. It is celebrated in many ways worldwide and falls on February 14 each year.

 

History_BYDK_Valentines_Day_SF_HD_still_624x352

 

What Do People Do?

Many people around the world celebrate Valentine´s Day by showing appreciation for the people they love or adore. Some people take their loved ones for a romantic dinner at a restaurant while others may choose this day to propose or get married. Many people give greeting cards, chocolate, jewelry or flowers, particularly roses, to their partners or admirers on Valentine´Day.

It is also a time to appreciate friends in some social circles and cultures. For example, Valentine´s Day in Finland refers to Friend´s Day, which is more about  remembering all friends rathers than focusing solely on romance. Valentine´s Day in Guatemala is known as Day of Love and Friendship. It is similar to Valentine´s Day customs and traditions countries such as the United States but it is also a time for many to show their appreciation for their friends.

 

January 2016, The Reader´s  Corner  BASIC LEVEL

chocolate-doesn-t-ask-silly-questions-chocolate-understands-4

 

There are many advantages in eating chocolate, especially dark chocolate. One of them is its heart-healthy benefits. Some researchers from the University of Harvard have stated that eating dark chocolate can reduce the markers for heart disease and helps to prevent body fat.

During the study, women aged 20 to 40 years old received 100 grams of dark chocolate with about 70% cocoa for 7 days.The results? Good cholesterol (HDL) went up and bad cholesterol (LDL) went down. And body circumference reduced.

For you, this doesn’t mean extra chocolate syrup on your ice cream or a Snickers bar at the grocery store check-out. Instead, it means eating high quality, organic dark chocolate with a minimum of 70% cocoa could help reduce your risk of heart disease.

Of course, eating with moderation is a must. Together with taking up some sport or doing exercise, eating chocolate helps you to produce endorphins, which are those hormones you produce when you fall in love. It is highly recommendable for anyone, and starting the New Year with something sweet is always a good idea.

So, a good New Year Resolution is eating some chocolate. Yay!

Read more: http://naturalsociety.com/dark-chocolate-reduce-excess-body-fat-one-week/#ixzz2gqZTWCoV

 

 

 

BASIC LEVEL    11th  DECEMBER

 

 

Coca Cola is drunk all over the world. 1.6 billion gallons are sold every year, in over one hundred and sixty countries.

The drink was invented by Dr John Pemberton in Atlanta, on 8th May 1886, and it was given the name Coca Cola by his partner, Frank Robinson. Frank Robinson suggested the name ‘Coca-Cola’ because both words named two ingredients found in the drink. They are the cola leaf and the kola nut.

In the first year, only nine drinks a day were sold. It was originally called a ‘brain and nerve tonic’ in Chemists. It was one of the thousands of exotic medicines sold in the 1800’s that actually contained cocaine.

In 1888 the business was bought by a man, Asa Candler and the first factory was opened in Dallas, Texas in 1895. Coca Cola is still made there.

‘Diet Coke’ has been made since 1982, and it’s now the world’s most popular brand of diet soft drinks.

It is certain that Coca Cola and Diet Coke will be drunk far into the twentieth century.

 

 

BASIC LEVEL, NOVEMBER 2015

 

TheWitches: A Book by Roald Dahl

 

Roadl Dahl´s The Witches tells the story of a brave Young boy and his Norwegian grandmother as they battle England´s witches.

 

Witches absolutely detest children. To a witch, a child smells like dogs’ droppings. And now the Grand High Witches planning to get rid of everychild in England – can anybody stop them?

The Witches tells the story of a brave young boy and his Norwegian grandmother as they battle agains tEngland’s child-hating witches. It continues to feature in lists dedicated to the scariest children’s books more than 30 years after it was first published. Especially around Halloween.

When he was a childhimself, RoaldDahl used to spend every summer holiday with his family in Norway, where he was inspired by bedtime stories of witches and magic. He wrote about these holidays in Boy: Tales of Childhood. It is also said that the grandmother in The Witches was partially inspired by Roald’s own mother. Roald dedicated the book to his wife, Liccy.

A film version of the story, starring AngelicaHuston as the witches’ leader The Grand High Witch, was released in 1990. The main difference between the film and the original story is the ending – in the book, there is no spellcast to changetheboy’s state back to what it was before the witches found him. The film also gives its central character the name Luke, whereas in the book we don’t find out the name of either the boy who narrates the story of his grandmother.

In 1983, the year it was published, TheWitches won three awards: The New York Times Outstanding Books Award, TheFederation of Children’s Book GroupsAward and The Whitbread Award.

 

From: Learn English. com

 

 

 

 

BASIC LEVEL 9TH OCTOBER 2015

http://saberingles.com.ar/reading/stonehenge.html

Stonehenge

Stonehenge is a Neolithic and Bronze Age megalithic monument located near Amesbury in the English county of Wiltshire, about 8 miles (13 km) north of Salisbury. Its geographical location is 51°10’43.87″N, 1°49’35.07″W.

It is composed of earthworks surrounding a circular setting of large standing stones and is one of the most famous prehistoric sites in the world. Archaeologists think that the standing stones were erected between 2500 BC and 2000 BC although the surrounding circular earth bank and ditch, which constitute the earliest phase of the monument, have been dated to about 3100 BC. The site and its surroundings were added to the UNESCO’s list of World Heritage Sites in 1986 in a co-listing with Avebury henge monument, and it is also a legally protected Scheduled Ancient Monument. Stonehenge itself is owned and managed by English Heritage while the surrounding land is owned by the National Trust.

EARHWORKS: a raised area of earth made, especially in the past, for defence against enemy attack

montículo

 

SURROUNDING: to be, or come, all round

rodear; cercar, sitiar; envolver

 

STANDING: to be in an upright position, not sitting or lying

estar de pie

 

ALTHOUGH: in spite of the fact that

aunque, a pesar de que

BANK: the ground at the edge of a river, lake etc

ribera, orilla

 

DITCH: a long narrow hollow dug in the ground especially one to drainwater from a field, road etc

zanja, foso, cuneta

 

EARLIEST (superlative form of EARLY): near the beginning (of a period of time etc)

en los inicios, al principio; pronto; temprano

 

SITE: a place where a building, town etc is, was, or is to be, built

sitio, lugar

 

OWNED (past form of OWN): to have as a possession

poseer, tener, ser dueño de

 

MANAGED (past form of MANAGE): to be in control or charge of

dirigir, llevar, administrar

 

WHILE during the time that

mientras

 

 

BASIC LEVEL 8TH MAY 2015

DOGS:  YOUR MOST FAITHFUL FRIENDS (from Time magazine)

“If you resist too much the power of the big primary-colour emotions that surround the dog, you’re missing the best experiencein your life.”

 

(Mark Twain)

 

Living with a pet, especially a dog, is one of those cherished things you can do in your life, and it brings awesome memories of your childhood.

Dogs love living-the moment. It’s hard for some humans to get this feeling and we can learn a lot from our canine friends. Even in the most difficult times, dogs are cheerful and ready for experience. They can teach us about love and compassion more than any other person or thing, too.

Loving a dog means, among other things, making peace with life, if you haven’t already. You don’t have to make eyes at every puppy picture you see in a magazine or bake your dog birthday cakes. But if you resist too much the power of the big primary-colour emotions that surround the dog, you’re missing the experience. …

Some people resist the dog culture with such passion precisely to avoid drama: if you give in to it, you will never be the same person.  The emotions around the dog are priceless…Especially if you have children at home. Dogs are nannies, and they help to educate our young ones more than anybody else in the family.

Last but not least: do not buy a dog. Adopt it. There are so many lovely creatures out there waiting for a home. They will never disappoint you. And you will become a better person. You will think that dogs are people, too. And they will always be ther for you to help and love.

So, what are you waiting for to enjoy the experience? Your life will never be the same.  Put a doggie in your life. You will never regret it. Not will your children.

 

 

 

 

BASIC LEVEL 27TH MARCH THE POWER OF RED

 

 

It’s London Fashion Week. The worlds’ fashionistas are blogging, tweeting and instagramming about this season’s looks and trends to a fashion-hungry audience. The colour of the moment is red – bright, bold and brave. In the language of clothing, red makes a statement. For some people, it stands for power; for others, red means danger. But where do these meanings come from – and is the power of the colour red changing?

Nowadays, when it comes to colour, most of us wear what we choose. But things were very different back in 15th century England, when only the rich and powerful – and their servants – could wear the colour red and the English King Henry VIII passed four separate laws to make sure everyone obeyed the rules.  A strict code governed the wearing of “costly apparel“, and red was one of the colours most rigidly controlled. No Englishman under the rank of Knight of the Garter (Orden de la Jarretera) was allowed to wear crimson velvet in their gowns, coats or any other part of their clothing.

 

But why the colour red? Professor Lisa Jardine of University College, London, says that the answer is all about money, power and status. The dyes that turned cloth red in Henry’s day were expensive – so only rich people could afford to wear red clothing. Henry’s laws were a way of controlling who was able to show their wealth, power and social status.

But red had other, more negative meanings – especially for women. The Book of Revelation made explicit, for early modern Protestants, the fact that the Church of Rome was a “scarlet woman”, the “Whore of Babylon”: The English phrase ‘scarlet woman’ describes a woman who has lots of sexual partners – so perhaps it doesn’t come as a surprise to learn that Queen Elizabeth I (also known as ‘The Virgin Queen’) often wore white as a symbol of her purity. She chose rich fabrics and costly jewelry (joyas) rather than scarlet to show her wealth and power on ceremonial occasions.

Queen Elizabeth II wore a white dress for her coronation on 2 June 1953. The Palace decided that the new Queen should not parade (desfilar) through the streets of London in scarlet, as her father and grandfather had done (both had travelled to Westminster in scarlet and ermine).

But times are changing, and these days, in western fashion at least, women can wear their favourite red dress without fear. Even the Queen wears red on public occasions, and red is one of the Duchess of Cambridge’s favourite colours.

So, fashionable women are definitely wearing red this season. I’m no scarlet woman, but I’m thinking about buying a pair of red boots for myself this winter. After all, if Princess Kate is wearing red this season – that’s good enough for me!

 

 

Vocabulary

fashionistas – people who are very interested in fashion. stands for – means; represents. pass- approve. (aprobar una ley) apparel- clothing. crimson -a bright red colour. velvet – A soft fabric, such as silk (terciopelo). gowns – A long, usually formal dress. when it comes to – this phrase introduces a topic you are going to talk about. dyes – special liquids that change the colour of cloth or hair.(tintes) wealth – a large amount of money and valuable things that a person or organisation owns. scarlet –a bright red colour. Whore – prostitute.   fabrics- cloth, material.(telas) purity – (here) the state of being completely good. ermain- animal (armiño) that in winter changes its fur (piel) to white. coronation – the ceremony when someone officially becomes king or queen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FEBRUARY 2015 BASIC LEVEL

 

 ST PATRICK’S DAY

Every year on March 17, the Irish and the Irish-at-heart across the globe observe St. Patrick’s Day. What began as a religious feast day for the patron saint of Ireland has become an international festival celebrating Irish culture with parades, dancing, special foods and a whole lot of green.

St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, is one of Christianity’s most widely known figures. But for all his celebrity, his life remains somewhat of a mystery. Many of the stories traditionally associated with St. Patrick, including the famous account of his banishing all the snakes from Ireland, are false, the products of hundreds of years of exaggerated storytelling.

People all over the world celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, especially places with large Irish-American communities. Feasting on the day features traditional Irish food, including corned beef, corned cabbage, coffee, soda bread, potatoes, and shepherd’s pie. Many celebrations also hold an Irish breakfast of sausage, black and white pudding, fried eggs, and fried tomatoes. Common traditions include:

  • Parades – This event is most often associated with the holiday. Cities that hold large parades include Boston, New York, Philadelphia, New Orleans, Savannah, and other cities worldwide.
  • Drinking – Since many Catholics are Irish-American, some may be required to fast from drinking during Lent. However, they are allowed to break this fast during the St. Patrick’s Day celebrations. This is one cause for the day’s association with drinking heavily.
  • Dying water or beer green – Chicago dies its river green for the festivities, and many bars serve green-dyed beer. The White House fountain is also dyed green.
  • Other incorporations of green – In Seattle, the parade routes are painted in green. Observers are supposed to wear green or else risk being pinched. Parade floats and decorations will feature the color green.
  • Religious services – Those who celebrate the holiday in a religious context may also hold a feast. Outside of this context, overindulgence tends to revolve around drinking.
  • Pea planting – In the Northeast, many celebrate by planting peas. This is largely due to the color and time of year (prime pea-planting conditions).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 BASIC LEVEL JANUARY 2015

SAINT VALENTINE’S DAY

 

 

 

Saint Valentine’s Day, commonly shortened to Valentine’s Day, is an annual commemoration held on February 14 celebrating love and affection between intimate companions. The day is named after one or more early Christian martyrs named Valentine and was established by Pope Gelasius I in 500 AD. It was deleted from the Roman calendar of saints in 1969 by Pope Paul VI, but its religious observance is still permitted. It is traditionally a day on which lovers express their love for each other by presenting flowers, small present, and sending greeting cards (known as “valentines”).
Modern Valentine’s Day symbols include the hearts, doves, and the figure of the winged Cupid. In the second half of the 20th century, the practice of exchanging cards was extended to all manner of gifts in the United States. Such gifts typically include roses and chocolates packed in a red satin, heart-shaped box. In the 1980s, the diamond industry began to promote Valentine’s Day as an occasion for giving jewelry.

The U.S. Greeting Card Association estimates that approximately 190 million valentines are sent each year in the US. Half of those valentines are given to family members other than husband or wife, usually to children. When you include the valentine-exchange cards made in school activities the figure goes up to 1 billion, and teachers become the people receiving the most valentines. In some North American elementary schools, children decorate classrooms, exchange cards, and are given sweets. The greeting cards of these students sometimes mention what they appreciate about each other.

The rise of Internet popularity at the turn of the millennium is creating new traditions. Millions of people use, every year, digital means of creating and sending Valentine’s Day greeting messages such as e-cards, love coupons or printable greeting cards. An estimated 15 million e-valentines were sent in 2010.

While sending cards, flowers, chocolates and other gifts is traditional in the UK, Valentine’s Day has various regional customs. In Norfolk, a character called ‘Jack’ Valentine knocks on the rear door of houses leaving sweets and presents for children. In Wales, many people celebrate Dydd Santes Dwynwen (St Dwynwen’s Day) on January 25 instead of (or as well as) Valentine’s Day. The day commemorates St Dwynwen, the patron saint of Welsh lovers.

 

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the  Wikipedia article “Valentine’s Day”. You can explore more on the Wikipedia website. The text and the images are used here only for educational purposes.

 

VOCABULARY.

Hold (v). Hold-held-held: to have or keep in the hand. Name after: Give someone or something the same name as the other person or thing. AD:Anno Domine (After Christ, Después de Cristo). Deleted: cancelled. Gifts: Presents.Jewelry: Necklaces (collares), rings, bracelets….made from precious metal.goes up to: ascend. Coupons: tickets. knocks on: hit (the door with the hand)

 

 

 

 

 

 

BASIC LEVEL DECEMBER 2014

 

Christmas in England

 

The English enjoy beautiful Christmas music. They love to decorate Christmas Trees and hang up evergreen branches.

The English gift giver is called Father Christmas. He wears a long red or green robe, and leaves presents in stockings on Christmas Eve. However, the gifts are not usually opened until the following afternoon.

Christmas in England began in AD 596, when St Augustine landed on her shores with monks who wanted to bring Christianity to the Anglo Saxons.

Father Christmas delivers them during the night before Christmas. The Children leave an empty stocking or pillowcase hanging at the end of the bed. In the morning they hope it will be full of presents.

In England the day after Christmas is called Boxing Day because boys used to go round collecting money in clay boxes. When the boxes were full, they broke them open.

In England Christmas dinner was usually eaten at Midday on December 25, during daylight.

In England the traditional Christmas dinner is roast turkey with vegetables and sauces. For dessert it is rich, fruity Christmas pudding with brandy sauce. Mince pies, pastry cases filled with a mixture of chopped dried fruit.

 

From: http://www.santas.net/englishchristmas.htm

HADRIAN’S WALL

 

Hadrian’s Wall was a defensive fortification in Roman Britain. Begun in AD 122, during the rule of emperor Hadrian, it was the first of two fortifications built across Great Britain, the second being the Antonine Wall, lesser known of the two because its physical remains are less evident today.

The wall was the most heavily fortified border in the Empire. In addition to its role as a military fortification, it is thought that many of the gates through the wall would have served as customs posts to allow trade and levy taxation.

A significant portion of the wall still exists, particularly the mid-section, and for much of its length the wall can be followed on foot by Hadrian’s Wall Path or by cycle on National Cycle Route 72. It is the most popular tourist attraction in Northern England. It was made a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987. English Heritage, a government organisation in charge of managing the historic environment of England, describes it as “the most important monument built by the Romans in Britain”.

Hadrian’s Wall was 80 Roman miles (73 statute miles or 120 km) long, its width and height dependent on the construction materials which were available nearby. East of River Irthing the wall was made from squared stone and measured 3 metres (9.7 ft) wide and five to six metres (16–20 ft) high, while west of the river the wall was made from turf and measured 6 metres (20 ft) wide and 3.5 metres (11.5 ft) high. This does not include the wall’s ditches, berms and forts. The central section measured eight Roman feet wide (7.8 ft or 2.4 m) on a 10-foot (3.0 m) base. Some parts of this section of the wall survive to a height of 10 feet (3.0 m).

Hadrian’s Wall was probably planned before Hadrian‘s visit to Britain in 122. According to restored sandstone fragments found in Jarrow the wall can be dated in 118 or 119. It is entirely possible that, on his arrival in Britain in 122, one of the stops on his itinerary was the northern frontier to inspect the progress of the wall as it was being built.

 

VOCABULARY

Customs: Government Department responsible for the collection of imports or exports. (Customs posts: Puestos de aduanas). Levy taxation: The collection of taxes. Turf: Ground and grass. Ditches/ Ditch: A channel dug in the earth (foso). Berm: Bank of earh serving as barrier (terraplén). Sandstone: Sedimentary rock (arenisca)

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the  Wikipedia article “Hadrian’s Wall”. You can explore more on the Wikipedia website. The text and the images are used here only for educational purposes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELEMENTARY LEVEL OCTOBER 2014

 

Map/Still


THE BRITISH ISLES

great britain map – Buscar con Google 

Many are not aware of the precise meaning of the term “Great Britain”. Even many British are unaware of the precise reality that the term expresses. Try asking a person living in the United Kingdom the exact meaning of the expression they have on their passports: “The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland”. Many will not be able to give an adequate answer. No wonder, therefore, that confusion also exists outside the United Kingdom and that in other European countries people erroneously group together the English, Scottish and Welsh under the word in their own language meaning “English”.

Here we shall try to explain the meaning of the terms “Great Britain”, “United Kingdom”, “British Islands” and “British Isles” as wells as the political and geographical realities that they express.

Great Britain is the largest island in Europe. “Great Britain” is the collective name for the three countries of England, Scotland and Wales. It also includes the small adjacent islands but it does not include the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.

The adjective “British” is, of course, used in relation to Great Britain but there is also a common tendency to use it when referring to issues relating to both Great Britain and the United Kingdom. This is inaccurate and from a legal point of view erroneous.

Sometimes, however, in legislation the term “British” is used to refer to the United Kingdom as a whole, especially in matters relating to the question of nationality.

The United Kingdom is made up of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

So, the United Kingdom of Great Britain, used to indicate the political union of England, Scotland and Wales, included Northern Ireland in the 20th century: the “United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland” as it now appears on passports.

From http://www.know-britain.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

BASIC LEVEL                                                      9TH MAY 2014

Oral English: 5 Tips for the Speaking Test

http://es.examspeak.com/Oral-English

 

Don’t give yes/no answers

Questions beginning with ‘Have you …’, ‘Do you …’, ‘Is it …’ etc can be answered simply with a yes or no answer. But that’s not enough!
Q: Do you like sports?
A: Yes. (Don’t stop there!) I play football every week with my friends. (Much better!)
Q: Have you any brothers and sisters?
A: No. (Don’t stop there!) I am the only child in my family. It’s just me, my mother and father. (Great!).

Explain ‘why’

During the oral English exam, the question ‘Why’ is often asked. Be ready for it!
Q: What do you do in your free time?
A: I really like playing guitar.
Q: Why do you like playing guitar?
A: Because… (Don’t panic, a simple reason is fine, sometimes it helps to repeat the full sentence) I like playing guitar because it’s very relaxing. (Good!)

Keep Going

The examiner wants to see you COMMUNICATING in English. If you don’t understand something, that’s ok, but don’t just sit there, ask for help:
“Sorry, could you say that again?”
If you can’t think of a word in English, that’s fine too, but try and paraphrase, explain the word:
“It’s something you use when…”
If you are talking and you get stuck, don’t worry! Start again:
“What I mean is…”
If you need a moment to think, say something, while you are thinking:
“Let’s see…”
The most important thing is to try to keep going, go on, and say something! You can have a little pause, but don’t leave too many long silences – they can be embarrassing.

Speak up!

It is therefore important to speak up! Don’t mumble your answer; don’t look down as you speak. LOOK UP AND SPEAK OUT and be heard by everyone!

Listen!

In order to be a good speaker, you need to be a GOOD LISTENER. During the speaking test you have to listen to the other candidate or follow instructions from the examiner. Stay calm and follow the conversation. Don’t keep jumping ahead to what you think the next question might be.
In the oral English, if you jump in with an answer, even in perfect English, but it’s not the answer to the question, you won’t impress the examiner.
Q: Why are you learning English?
A: I have been learning English since I was five years old. (Beautiful English, but is this the answer to the question? Was the candidate listening?)

Summary

The oral English test is your chance to show that you can speak and communicate in English. Take the opportunity! Give full answers, listen to the questions you are being asked. Don’t focus on being perfect; focus on communicating with the examiner and the other candidate. You might even enjoy yourself. Good luck!

BASIC LEVEL    4TH APRIL

BREAKING NEWS

http://www.breakingnewsenglish.com/

Britons most afraid of heights and snakes (28th March)

A survey from a U.K. company shows what British people are most afraid of. Top of the list is heights. Over half of people said they had a fear of heights. In second place was a fear of snakes. The third biggest fear was public speaking. Twenty per cent of people were “very afraid” of speaking in public. Other things include spiders, mice, injections, blood, flying, and being in small spaces. Number 10 on the list was the fear of clowns.

Over 2,000 people answered questions about common phobias. There were big differences between men and women, and between old and young people. The researchers said not everyone is “created equal when it comes to fears”. Women were afraid of more things than men. Spiders scare a third of men and about half of women. Young people are more afraid of public speaking. Older people are more afraid of heights.

Kenya to let men have many wives (24th March)

Kenya’s government has agreed on a new marriage law. Many female politicians are very angry. The Marriage Bill lets men have as many wives as they want. Men can soon marry other women without telling their wife. There was a big argument between male and female politicians. Many female lawmakers walked out of the debate. The law was going to make it illegal to have more than one wife, but lawmakers changed their mind. One male politician said the law was fair to women because divorced women now get 30 per cent of the family house and other things belonging to the couple.

One politician said the law keeps alive Kenya’s traditions. He said: “When you marry an African woman, she must know the second one is on the way, and a third wife. This is Africa.” A newspaper said this showed Kenya wasn’t a modern country. It wrote: “This is a backwards move that is simply taking us back into the Dark Ages, at a time when we should be strengthening family values.” A female politician said the law was unfair because the second wife would take all the money. She said: “We know that men are afraid of women’s tongues more than anything else.”

 

 

 

 

Nivel Básico 7th March

http://www.kidskonnect.com/subjectindex/32-categories/holidaysseasons/129-saint-patricks-day.html

St. Patrick’s Day

Fast Facts

 

1. St. Patrick’s Day is the national holiday of Ireland and is usually celebrated on March 17.

 

2.  St. Patrick’s Day has become a popular holiday in the United States.  People wear green and eat corned beef and cabbage.

3. St. Patrick was a Roman-Britain-born Christian missionary who was born in the late fourth century. He brought Christianity to the Irish people.

4. It is also believed St. Patrick drove all the snakes out of Ireland. However, post-glacial Ireland never actually had snakes. Today, there are no snakes to be found!

5. Most people, whether they are Irish or not, wear green on this day. One of the Irish traditions is to pinch anyone who is not wearing green on St. Patrick’s Day.

6. Irish immigrants began observing the holiday in Boston in 1737 and the first St. Patrick’s Day parade was held in New York City in 1766.

7. Corned beef and cabbage are traditional foods eaten on this holiday.

8. The shamrock, pot-of-gold and leprechauns are also associated with St. Patrick’s Day. The shamrock was worn as a badge on the lapel. Three is Ireland’s magic number and the three petals that make up the shamrock are supposed to bring good luck. The three leaves also represent the Trinity in the Christian religion.

9. The leprechaun is a small Irish fairy. He is dressed like a shoemaker, with pointed shoes and hat. He also wears a leather apron. Leprechauns are supposed to be unfriendly little men who live alone in the forest, spending all of their time making shoes and guarding their treasures. If someone catches a leprechaun, he will be forced to tell where he hides all his pots of gold. However, the leprechaun must be watched at all times. If his captor looks away, the leprechaun will vanish along with his treasure.

10. St. Patrick’s Day has become a holiday all around the world and for one day out of the year anyone can be Irish and join in the celebration.

 

TO PINCH: to squeeze (someone’s skin) between your thumb and finger often in a painful way.

SHAMROCK                        LEPRECHAUN                               POT OF GOLD

 

Basic Lasic Level 9th February

News all over the world http://www.breakingnewsenglish.com/

                        250 million children cannot read or write (2nd February, 2014)

Over 250 million primary school children cannot read, write or do basic maths. Up to 120 million children have never been to school. This makes countries poorer. Countries lose up to $130 billion every year. The U.N. said there is a “learning crisis”. In 30% of countries, 75% of primary school teachers do not have enough training.

Most children not going to school are girls. Countries are richer when girls go to school. Almost 66% of girls in some countries never go to school. In Yemen, just 36% of girls are literate. Girls in poorer countries will not be literate until 2072. In Laos, Rwanda and Vietnam, the number of children not going to school fell by 85%.

Literate=  able to read and write

Future rats could be the size of sheep (6th February, 2014)

Rats the size of sheep could be real in the future. Giant rats could weigh 80kg. Rats are now all over the Earth. They are in placer that never had rats before. They are the strongest animals in many places. There are fewer and fewer animals that can kill rats. Rats might grow to become the world’s largest rodent.

Humans spread rats around the world. They can live almost anywhere. The future might have many kinds of different rats. After the dinosaurs, many small animals grew bigger. The same thing could happen with rats. They might make other animals extinct. A question is what we would do about giant rats.

Basic Level 13th January

The United Kingdom

 

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, or UK, is in Western Europe. It comprises the island of Great Britain (England, Scotland and Wales) and the northern one-sixth of the island of Ireland (Northern Ireland), together with many smaller islands.
The mainland areas lie between latitudes 49°N and 59°N (the Shetland Islands reach to nearly 61°N), and longitudes 8°W to 2°E. The Royal Greenwich Observatory, near London, is the defining point of the Prime Meridian. The United Kingdom has a total area of approximately 245,000 km².
The UK lies between the North Atlantic Ocean and the North Sea, and comes within 35 km (22 miles) of the northwest coast of France, from which it is separated by the English Channel.
Northern Ireland shares a 360 km international land boundary with the Republic of Ireland. The Channel Tunnel (“Chunnel”), bored beneath the English Channel, now links the UK with France.

Basic level 13th December

 

      
   

Why was Cinderella such a poor football player?

Because she kept running away from the BALL!  (ball: social event where you dance) 

 

What’s an ig?

A skimo’s house without a LOO! (loo: toilet)

 

What never eats at Christmas time?

A turkey, it’s usually STUFFED! (stuffed: filled, and when you have eaten too much)

 

How does a yeti get down the hill?

BY-ICICLE! (icycle: hanging ice formed by the freezing of dripping water)

 

What is a mum’s favourite Christmas Carol?

SILENT NIGHT

 

Why is it cold at Christmas?

Because it is Decemberrrrrrrr!

 

What did Adam say the day before Christmas?

It’s Christmas, Eve (eve: the evening or day before a special day or festival)

What do you have in December that you don’t have in any other month?

The letter D

 

It was Christmas and the judge was in a merry mood as he asked the prisoner,”What are you charged with?” 


“Doing my Christmas shopping early”, replied the defendant.


“That’s no offence”, said the judge. 

” It is if you do it before the shop opened”, answered the prisoner.

 

What’s a child’s favourite king at Christmas?

A stocKING! (stocking: item of clothing where Santa Claus puts his presents)

 

What’s the difference between the Christmas alphabet and the ordinary alphabet?

The Christmas alphabet has NOEL (no ‘l’)

 

What happened to a man who shoplifted a calendar at Christmas? (shoplifting: stealing good in a shop during shopping hours)

He got 12 months!

 

 

 

 

 

BASIC LEVEL 8TH November 2013

http://www.newsinlevels.com/products/special-activities-in-a-car-level-1/

Special activities in a car

  Phoning-and-making-up-while-driving-is-the-reason-why-women-become-unwise-drivers

  
Level 1

Police from Britain make a video. Police make this video on British roads. The video shows something interesting.

It shows drivers. The drivers do things when they drive. The drivers do this because they don’t have enough time. The drivers brush their teeth, talk on the phone or write things. One woman puts on make-up while she drives.

It is illegal to do this. Police catch 200 people. These people must pay £100.

Difficult words: make-up (things which women put on their faces to be more beautiful), illegal (when you do something illegal, you have a problem with the bosses).

 

 

Level 2

The British police made a video on some of the UK’s busiest motorways. What does the video say about British drivers?

A lot of them are quite irresponsible as they do other things while they’re driving. Most of them are probably in a hurry so they do things which should be done in the bathroom instead. The video shows how people brush their teeth, talk to people on the phone, read or write something they think is important. One woman was filmed while she was putting on make-up!

Almost 200 drivers were charged. They will lose three points on their licence and will have to pay £100.

Difficult words: irresponsible (they do dangerous things), hurry (they don’t have enough time), charge (say that somebody did something wrong).

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